Posts Tagged ‘Aeschylus’

THE PERILS OF BELIEF

A famous dictum, espoused by Aeschylus and repeated by former U.S. senator Hiram Johnson (California), states that the first casualty of war is truth. In our time, social media, faux news organizations and politicians have rendered truth a severe casualty. They’ve bombarded it—even shredded it—with belief. Even basketball stars have joined their ranks.

Kyrie Irving of the Cleveland Cavaliers stated that the earth is flat. “This is not even a conspiracy theory,” he said, although an unknown “they” want us to believe that the earth is round. The Golden State Warriors’ Draymond Green gave his own take, surmising that the earth could be flat. “I don’t know,” he said, desiring to appear reasonable. “I haven’t done enough research.”

Research? Gazing out the window of an airplane at 35,000 feet on a clear day—NBA players don’t always fly at night—reveals the earth’s curvature. Or does that mean the earth is merely bent?

Don’t look just to some athletes, though. Donald Trump claimed his inauguration crowd was the biggest ever. Photographs and other evidence disproved that. White House press secretary Sean Spicer replied, “That’s what the president believes.” Will presidential beliefs—heedless of fact—commit the United States to domestic and international policies ranging from reckless to disastrous?

Often, truth is a click or two away. Many people refuse to go there. A widely circulating email purportedly by Warren Buffet claims that members of Congress receive their salary for life. FactCheck.org reviewed these claims two years ago. Its conclusion: false. Members of the House and Senate qualify for retirement benefits after five years and only for a portion of their salaries, which max out at 80 percent after virtually a lifetime in Washington.

Belief has a cousin called deception. Making the rounds of Facebook is a video from NumbersUSA demonstrating that U.S. immigration policy cannot solve global poverty. Roy Beck, the organization’s founder/president, uses gumballs in glass containers to colorfully demonstrate that America’s taking in one million of the poorest of the poor each year will not put a dent in the problem.

Beck is right. Poverty must be solved locally. However, the video represents a political shell game. U.S. immigration policy has never been about alleviating global poverty. We accept people who can contribute to our economy along with refugees. We limit their numbers, which is our right and obligation. But this video imitates a magician drawing attention to one hand while the other prepares to pull a coin from your ear. It can lead many Americans to want to shut off immigration entirely or support draconian measures for reasons having nothing to do with the reality of American immigration policy.

I have no problem with belief in the religious sense. I demonstrate that each Friday night in synagogue. Faith enables individuals and communities to discover and reinforce meaning in their lives and connect to something greater if not entirely knowable, even as science dramatically increases our knowledge base.

Still, faith must co-exist with reason, not replace it. In secular matters, belief offers a poor substitute for rational analysis based on facts. And facts do exist. I pray that we demonstrate the wisdom to know when each approach is appropriate, particularly when individuals explore cyberspace and Washington makes decisions involving the economy, human rights and geopolitical policy.

Want to take something on faith alone? Believe that you’ll enjoy my new novel The Odd Plight of Adonis Licht, available soon.

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BIRTHER 102

I’m thinking about running for President in 2020, but two factors give me pause. One is my age. I’ll be 76 then. Of course, a President Trump would be 74 prior to re-election, or a President Clinton 72. It’s the second factor that worries me.

I may have to prove I’m an American-born citizen. Obviously, President Trump wouldn’t make a fuss. As Trump informed the nation last week, “Hillary Clinton and her campaign of 2008 started the birther controversy. I finished it.” But how about Mrs. Clinton? Will she target me for Birther 102?

Like President Obama, I’m a member of a minority religion. Yes, a Jew, Joe Lieberman, ran for vice president on the ticket with Al Gore in 2004. And Bernie Sanders gave Hillary a run for her money in the Democratic primaries. Still, I imagine that the same people who fear a Muslim in the White House breathed sighs of relief. Although I don’t think they’re Hillary supporters.

Also like President Obama, I have a foreign-born father. My dad was 2-1/2 when he came to the United States—an immigrant! My mother was born in Manhattan—she claimed. I’m under the impression I was born in the Bronx, but doubts could arise. Red flag: my parents were living in Queens at the time.

My alibi? My folks previously lived in the Bronx where my sister was born. My mother wanted to keep her obstetrician. Given lighter traffic then, my father could quickly drive my mother to the birthing hospital.

Question: Does that story sound shaky?

Another question: How much insanity can Americans take? Hillary Clinton didn’t start the birther movement. Worse, Trump railed on for years then, after conceding, never owned up or apologized. So yes, I’m more than skeptical when the Donald claims credit for clearing up the question of Mr. Obama’s birth and promises to “make America great again.”

Yet I suspect that Trump sees himself as a hero. I imagine he’ll feel slighted if President Obama fails to host him at a White House dinner and award him a gold (has to be gold) medal. After all, if the New York Mets or the New York Yankees win the World Series—or even the pennant—Trump probably will take credit. (Otherwise they’re losers.)

In George Orwell’s classic novel 1984, Big Brother declares that “black is white” and “war is peace.” Language functions as a key tool for government oppression because truth becomes whatever the forces in power say it is. As the Greek dramatist Aeschylus wrote, “In war, truth is the first casualty.” Truth doesn’t fare well in politics, either. With Trump, it’s no mere casualty. It’s a fatality.

As to my 2020 presidential run, I remain on the fence. Sure, I’d love to fly around the world on Air Force One, as I explained in a previous post “My (Maybe) Run for the White House” (5-16-14). I might upsize the national chanukiah. But to date, only my parents along with clerks in the Bronx (New York) and Bexar County (Texas) court houses, the U.S. Army and the State Department (my passport says I was born in the Bronx) plus my wife have seen my birth certificate. I prefer to keep it that way.

Or am I hiding something even I don’t know about?

If you enjoy these posts, suggest to family and friends that they check out davidperlstein.com. Post something on Facebook, too. And give a little thought to how much truth the nation is willing to sacrifice because lies make frustrated people feel better.

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